Coach Shoulder Bag Outlet Oakley Sunglasses http://www.chinacheapnfljerseys.us.com Wholesale Baseball Jerseys Canada Coach Factory Coupons NFL Jerseys Free Shipping Cheap NFL Jerseys China Cheap UGGs Kate Spade Outlet Online Chanel Outlet Gucci Outlet Online Michael Kors Bag Black Borse Portadocumenti Gucci Red Bottom Shoes My Cheap Jerseys Greg Little Womens Jersey Gucci Handbags On Sale Cheap Oakley Sunglasses UGG Boots Australia Cheap League Jerseys Chanel Handbags Rebel Sport NBA Jerseys Louis Vuitton Outlet Michael Kors Outlet Stores Cheap Jerseys Free Shipping Jerseys Cheap Wholesale NFL Jerseys NFL Jerseys In Fort Wayne Jerseys Wholesale
Masons freemasons | Secret Societies

Coach Shoulder Bag Outlet Oakley Sunglasses http://www.chinacheapnfljerseys.us.com Wholesale Baseball Jerseys Canada Coach Factory Coupons NFL Jerseys Free Shipping Cheap NFL Jerseys China Cheap UGGs Kate Spade Outlet Online Chanel Outlet Gucci Outlet Online Michael Kors Bag Black Borse Portadocumenti Gucci Red Bottom Shoes My Cheap Jerseys Greg Little Womens Jersey Gucci Handbags On Sale Cheap Oakley Sunglasses UGG Boots Australia Cheap League Jerseys Chanel Handbags Rebel Sport NBA Jerseys Louis Vuitton Outlet Michael Kors Outlet Stores Cheap Jerseys Free Shipping Jerseys Cheap Wholesale NFL Jerseys NFL Jerseys In Fort Wayne Jerseys Wholesale

Masons the start

on Feb 8, 2012 in Masons

Watch the vid of some masons on

Parade and now read this

PREFACE.
Of the various modes of communicating instruction to the uninformed, the masonic student is particularly interested in two; namely, the instruction by legends and that by symbols. It is to these two, almost exclusively, that he is indebted for all that he knows, and for all that he can know, of the philosophic system which is taught in the institution. All its mysteries and its dogmas, which constitute its philosophy, are intrusted for communication to the neophyte, sometimes to one, sometimes to the other of these two methods of instruction, and sometimes to both of them combined. The Freemason has no way of reaching any of the esoteric teachings of the Order except through the medium of a legend or a symbol. A legend differs from an historical narrative only in this—that it is without documentary evidence of authenticity. It is the offspring solely of tradition. Its details may be true in part or in whole. There may be no internal evidence to the contrary, or there may be internal evidence that they are altogether false. But neither the possibility of truth in the one case, nor the certainty of falsehood in the other, can remove the traditional narrative from the class of legends. It is a legend simply because it rests on no written foundation. It is oral, and therefore legendary.

In grave problems of history, such as the establishment of empires, the discovery and settlement of countries, or the rise and fall of dynasties, the knowledge of the truth or falsity of the legendary narrative will be of importance, because the value of history is impaired by the imputation of doubt. But it is not so in Freemasonry. Here there need be no absolute question of the truth or falsity of the legend. The object of the masonic legends is not to establish historical facts, but to convey philosophical doctrines. They are a method by which esoteric instruction is communicated, and the student accepts them with reference to nothing else except their positive use and meaning as developing masonic dogmas. Take, for instance, the Hiramic legend of the third degree. Of what importance is it to the disciple of Masonry whether it be true or false? All that he wants to know is its internal signification; and when he learns that it is intended to illustrate the doctrine of the immortality of the soul, he is content with that interpretation, and he does not deem it necessary, except as a matter of curious or antiquarian inquiry, to investigate its historical accuracy, or to reconcile any of its apparent contradictions. So of the lost keystone; so of the second temple; so of the hidden ark: these are

to him legendary narratives, which, like the casket, would be of no value were it not for the precious jewel contained within. Each of these legends is the expression of a philosophical idea. But there is another method of masonic instruction, and that is by symbols. No science is more ancient than that of symbolism. At one time, nearly all the learning of the world was conveyed in symbols. And although modern philosophy now deals only in abstract propositions, Freemasonry still cleaves to the ancient method, and has preserved it in its primitive importance as a means of communicating knowledge. According to the derivation of the word from the Greek, “to symbolize” signifies “to compare one thing with another.” Hence a symbol is the expression of an idea that has been derived from the comparison or contrast of some object with a moral conception or attribute.

Thus we say that the plumb is a symbol of rectitude of conduct. The physical qualities of the plumb are here compared or contrasted with the moral conception of virtue, or rectitude. Then to the Speculative Mason it becomes, after he has been taught its symbolic meaning, the visible expression of the idea of moral uprightness. But although there are these two modes of instruction in Freemasonry, by legends and by symbols,—there really is no radical difference between the two methods. The symbol is a visible, and the legend an audible representation of some contrasted idea—of some moral conception produced from a comparison. Both the legend and the symbol relate to dogmas of a deep religious character; both of them convey moral sentiments in the same peculiar method, and both of them are designed by this method to illustrate the philosophy of Speculative Masonry. To investigate the recondite meaning of these legends and symbols, and to elicit from them the moral and philosophical lessons which they were intended to teach, is to withdraw the veil with which ignorance and indifference seek to conceal the true philosophy of Freemasonry.

To study the symbolism of Masonry is the only way to investigate its philosophy. This is the portal of its temple, through which alone we can gain access to the sacellum where its aporrheta are concealed.
Its philosophy is engaged in the consideration of propositions relating to God and man, to the present and the future life. Its science is the symbolism by which these propositions are presented

TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. PRELIMINARY. ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 1
II. THE NOACHIDÆ. …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 10
III. THE PRIMITIVE FREEMASONRY OF ANTIQUITY. ……………………………………………….. 12
IV. THE SPURIOUS FREEMASONRY OF ANTIQUITY. ………………………………………………… 15
V. THE ANCIENT MYSTERIES. ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 20
VI. THE DIONYSIAC ARTIFICERS. ………………………………………………………………………………….. 23
VII. THE UNION OF SPECULATIVE AND OPERATIVE MASONRY AT THE TEMPLE OF SOLOMON. ………………………………………………………………………………. 30
VIII. THE TRAVELLING FREEMASONS OF THE MIDDLE AGES. ……………………………….. 33
IX. DISSEVERANCE OF THE OPERATIVE ELEMENT. ………………………………………………….. 36
X. THE SYSTEM OF SYMBOLIC INSTUCTION. …………………………………………………………… 39
XI. THE SPECULATIVE SCIENCE AND THE OPERATIVE ART. ………………………………… 42
XII. THE SYMBOLISM OF SOLOMON’S TEMPLE. ………………………………………………………….. 47
XIII. THE FORM OF THE LODGE. ……………………………………………………………………………………… 56
XIV. THE OFFICERS OF A LODGE. …………………………………………………………………………………….. 60
XV. THE POINT WITHIN A CIRCLE. ……………………………………………………………………………….. 62
XVI. THE COVERING OF THE LODGE. ……………………………………………………………………………. 65
XVII. RITUALISTIC SYMBOLISM. ………………………………………………………………………………………… 69
XVIII. THE RITE OF DISCALCEATION. ……………………………………………………………………………….. 71
XIX. THE RITE OF INVESTITURE. ……………………………………………………………………………………… 74
XX. THE SYMBOLISM OF THE GLOVES. …………………………………………………………………………. 78
XXI. THE RITE OF CIRCUMAMBULATION. …………………………………………………………………….. 82
XXII. THE RITE OF INTRUSTING, AND THE SYMBOLISM OF LIGHT. ……………………. 86
XXIII. SYMBOLISM OF THE CORNER-STONE. ………………………………………………………………….. 93
XXIV. THE INEFFABLE NAME. ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 102
XXV. THE LEGENDS OF FREEMASONRY. ………………………………………………………………………. 116
XXVI. THE LEGEND OF THE WINDING STAIRS. ………………………………………………………….. 125
XXVII. THE LEGEND OF THE THIRD DEGREE. ………………………………………………………………. 133
XXVIII. THE SPRIG OF ACACIA. ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 144
XXIX. THE SYMBOLISM OF LABOR. ………………………………………………………………………………….. 152
XXX. THE STONE OF FOUNDATION. …………………………………………………………………………….. 163
XXXI. THE LOST WORD. ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 176
SYNOPTICAL INDEX. ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 185
FOOTNOTES ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 238
1
I.
PRELIMINARY.
THE ORIGIN AND PROGRESS OF FREEMASONRY.
Any inquiry into the symbolism and philosophy of Freemasonry must necessarily be preceded by a brief investigation of the origin and history of the institution. Ancient and universal as it is, whence did it arise? What were the accidents connected with its birth? From what kindred or similar association did it spring? Or was it original and autochthonic, independent, in its inception, of any external influences, and unconnected with any other institution? These are questions which an intelligent investigator will be disposed to propound in the very commencement of the inquiry; and they are questions which must be distinctly answered before he can be expected to comprehend its true character as a symbolic institution. He must know something of its antecedents, before he can appreciate its character. But he who expects to arrive at a satisfactory solution of this inquiry must first—as a preliminary absolutely necessary to success—release himself from the influence of an error into which novices in Masonic philosophy are too apt to fall. He must not confound the doctrine of Freemasonry with its outward and extrinsic form. He must not suppose that certain usages and ceremonies, which exist at this day, but which, even now, are subject to extensive variations in different countries, constitute the sum and substance of Freemasonry. “Prudent antiquity,” says Lord Coke, “did for more solemnity and better memory and observation of that which is to be done, express substances under ceremonies.” But it must be always remembered that the ceremony is not the substance. It is but the outer garment which covers and perhaps adorns it, as clothing does the human figure. But divest man of that outward apparel, and you still have the microcosm, the wondrous creation, with all his nerves, and bones, and muscles, and, above all, with his brain, and thoughts, and feelings. And so take from Masonry these external ceremonies, and you still have remaining its philosophy and science. These have, of course, always continued the same, while the ceremonies have varied in different ages, and still vary in different countries.
The definition of Freemasonry that it is “a science of morality, veiled in allegory, and illustrated by symbols,” has been so often quoted, that,
2
were it not for its beauty, it would become wearisome. But this definition contains the exact principle that has just been enunciated. Freemasonry is a science—a philosophy—a system of doctrines which is taught, in a manner peculiar to itself, by allegories and symbols. This is its internal character. Its ceremonies are external additions, which affect not its substance. Now, when we are about to institute an inquiry into the origin of Freemasonry, it is of this peculiar system of philosophy that we are to inquire, and not of the ceremonies which have been foisted on it. If we pursue any other course we shall assuredly fall into error. Thus, if we seek the origin and first beginning of the Masonic philosophy, we must go away back into the ages of remote antiquity, when we shall find this beginning in the bosom of kindred associations, where the same philosophy was maintained and taught. But if we confound the ceremonies of Masonry with the philosophy of Masonry, and seek the origin of the institution, moulded into outward form as it is to-day, we can scarcely be required to look farther back than the beginning of the eighteenth century, and, indeed, not quite so far. For many important modifications have been made in its rituals since that period. Having, then, arrived at the conclusion that it is not the Masonic ritual, but the Masonic philosophy, whose origin we are to investigate, the next question naturally relates to the peculiar nature of that philosophy. Now, then, I contend that the philosophy of Freemasonry is engaged in the contemplation of the divine and human character; of GOD as one eternal, self-existent being, in contradiction to the mythology of the ancient peoples, which was burdened with a multitude of gods and goddesses, of demigods and heroes; of MAN as an immortal being, preparing in the present life for an eternal future, in like contradiction to the ancient philosophy, which circumscribed the existence of man to the present life.
These two doctrines, then, of the unity of God and the immortality of the soul, constitute the philosophy of Freemasonry. When we wish to define it succinctly, we say that it is an ancient system of philosophy which teaches these two dogmas. And hence, if, amid the intellectual darkness and debasement of the old polytheistic religions, we find interspersed here and there, in all ages, certain institutions or associations which taught these truths, and that, in a particular way,
3
allegorically and symbolically, then we have a right to say that such institutions or associations were the incunabula—the predecessors—of the Masonic institution as it now exists. With these preliminary remarks the reader will be enabled to enter upon the consideration of that theory of the origin of Freemasonry which I advance in the following propositions:—
1. In the first place, I contend that in the very earliest ages of the world there were existent certain truths of vast importance to the welfare and happiness of humanity, which had been communicated,—no matter how, but,—most probably, by direct inspiration from God to man.
2. These truths principally consisted in the abstract propositions of the unity of God and the immortality of the soul. Of the truth of these two propositions there cannot be a reasonable doubt. The belief in these truths is a necessary consequence of that religious sentiment which has always formed an essential feature of human nature. Man is, emphatically, and in distinction from all other creatures, a religious animal. Gross commences his interesting work on “The Heathen Religion in its Popular and Symbolical Development” by the statement that “one of the most remarkable phenomena of the human race is the universal existence of religious ideas—a belief in something supernatural and divine, and a worship corresponding to it.” As nature had implanted the religious sentiment, the same nature must have directed it in a proper channel. The belief and the worship must at first have been as pure as the fountain whence they flowed, although, in subsequent times, and before the advent of Christian light, they may both have been corrupted by the influence of the priests and the poets over an ignorant and superstitious people. The first and second propositions of my theory refer only to that primeval period which was antecedent to these corruptions, of which I shall hereafter speak.
3. These truths of God and immortality were most probably handed down through the line of patriarchs of the race of Seth, but were, at all events, known to Noah, and were by him communicated to his immediate descendants.
4. In consequence of this communication, the true worship of God continued, for some time after the subsidence of the deluge, to be cultivated by the Noachidae, the Noachites, or the
4
descendants of Noah.
5. At a subsequent period (no matter when, but the biblical record places it at the attempted building of the tower of Babel), there was a secession of a large number of the human race from the Noachites.
6. These seceders rapidly lost sight of the divine truths which had been communicated to them from their common ancestor, and fell into the most grievous theological errors, corrupting the purity of the worship and the orthodoxy of the religious faith which they had primarily received.
7. These truths were preserved in their integrity by but a very few in the patriarchal line, while still fewer were enabled to retain only dim and glimmering portions of the true light.
8. The first class was confined to the direct descendants of Noah, and the second was to be found among the priests and philosophers, and, perhaps, still later, among the poets of the heathen nations, and among those whom they initiated into the secrets of these truths. Of the prevalence of these religious truths among the patriarchal descendants of Noah, we have ample evidence in the sacred records. As to their existence among a body of learned heathens, we have the testimony of many intelligent writers who have devoted their energies to this subject. Thus the learned Grote, in his “History of Greece,” says, “The allegorical interpretation of the myths has been, by several learned investigators, especially by Creuzer, connected with the hypothesis of an ancient and highly instructed body of priests, having their origin either in Egypt or in the East, and communicating to the rude and barbarous Greeks religious, physical, and historical knowledge, under the veil of symbols.” What is here said only of the Greeks is equally applicable to every other intellectual nation of antiquity.
9. The system or doctrine of the former class has been called by Masonic writers the “Pure or Primitive Freemasonry” of antiquity, and that of the latter class the “Spurious Freemasonry” of the same period. These terms were first used, if I mistake not, by Dr. Oliver, and are intended to refer—the word pure to the doctrines taught by the descendants of Noah in the Jewish line and the word spurious to his descendants in the heathen or Gentile line.

Please login to read more


lock

Sorry, this content is for members only

Click here to get access

Already a member? Login below


Email
Password
 

Forgot Password




Not a member yet? Get access here

Protected by Copyscape Online Infringement Detector

Coach Shoulder Bag Outlet Oakley Sunglasses http://www.chinacheapnfljerseys.us.com Wholesale Baseball Jerseys Canada Coach Factory Coupons NFL Jerseys Free Shipping Cheap NFL Jerseys China Cheap UGGs Kate Spade Outlet Online Chanel Outlet Gucci Outlet Online Michael Kors Bag Black Borse Portadocumenti Gucci Red Bottom Shoes My Cheap Jerseys Greg Little Womens Jersey Gucci Handbags On Sale Cheap Oakley Sunglasses UGG Boots Australia Cheap League Jerseys Chanel Handbags Rebel Sport NBA Jerseys Louis Vuitton Outlet Michael Kors Outlet Stores Cheap Jerseys Free Shipping Jerseys Cheap Wholesale NFL Jerseys NFL Jerseys In Fort Wayne Jerseys Wholesale

Coach Shoulder Bag Outlet Oakley Sunglasses http://www.chinacheapnfljerseys.us.com Wholesale Baseball Jerseys Canada Coach Factory Coupons NFL Jerseys Free Shipping Cheap NFL Jerseys China Cheap UGGs Kate Spade Outlet Online Chanel Outlet Gucci Outlet Online Michael Kors Bag Black Borse Portadocumenti Gucci Red Bottom Shoes My Cheap Jerseys Greg Little Womens Jersey Gucci Handbags On Sale Cheap Oakley Sunglasses UGG Boots Australia Cheap League Jerseys Chanel Handbags Rebel Sport NBA Jerseys Louis Vuitton Outlet Michael Kors Outlet Stores Cheap Jerseys Free Shipping Jerseys Cheap Wholesale NFL Jerseys NFL Jerseys In Fort Wayne Jerseys Wholesale